Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Intentional By Design: Being responsive to the learners and the system within which they work

In January, we identified hallmarks of a structure that we use when working with a system or school over time. The following is the first of seven posts that serve to illuminate those hallmarks.

Once A Teacher, Always A Teacher

We are educators. It’s not just a job; it’s who we are. Just as elementary and secondary teachers and leaders are responsive to their students, we are responsive to our learners and the system within which they work. We don’t just open the computer and run the slides. Like you, we begin our planning with the provincial curricula (of the province you are in, not the one we are from!) and district documents. Every agenda is custom-designed, based on those local documents and the needs identified by those who know the learners best. It is exactly as teachers plan for each new group of learners, meeting them just where they are.

So what does that mean in practical terms?

It means that when we are invited by, for example, the Wikwemikong Board of Education in Ontario to come and do a writing lesson study week (a week of being the writing teacher in residence who demonstrates the teaching of writing, along with the big ideas of assessment), we must first be familiar with Growing Success to truly understand the context. It means that the learning destinations we create for the students are based on the Ontario language arts curriculum and that the writing we do is driven by the interests and passions of the students and not a canned lesson we have done ten times in other schools, other districts, other jurisdictions, or other provinces.

It means that the learning sequences we prepare are always in draft form. In fact, our published agendas (whether on chart paper or a PowerPoint slide) consistently include the word ‘Proposed.’  


We are deliberately tentative, because we need to continually engage with adult learners in order to determine the very best next instructional step.  We adjust based on our observations and conversations – just as teachers adapt their lessons to best suit their students and just as the tenets of formative assessment demand.  In many cases, we use an electronic back channel, like todaysmeet.com, to collect questions, connections, and comments.  Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we structure our day’s plan in this way because it is the very thing that teachers are expected to do each and every day in their classrooms – be responsive to their students.  As leaders, it is imperative that we model this in adult learning sessions, so as to both bring alignment and, quite frankly, to not ask teachers to do things in ways we are not prepared to do ourselves.

In our next post, we will further examine the second hallmark that we outlined in January 2017 - We use the principles of assessment for learning as a structure for adult learning.